All posts by Phil Barker

Not quite certifiable

After a slight delay, last week I received the result of my CMALT (Certified Membership of the Association for Learning Technology) submission.  While most of it was fine, the area which I had thought weakest, Core area 3: The wider context, was rated as inadequate. It has been lovely to see so many people celebrating gaining their CMALT over the last few months; and many of them have said how useful they found it to have access to examples of successful portfolios, which has also been my experience, but in the hope that it is also useful to see examples that fall short, and also in the hope that some of you might be able to provide feedback on improving it, I thought I would share here my unsuccessful portfolio. Continue reading

Quick update on W3C Community Group on Educational and Occupational Credentials

The work with the W3C Community Group on educational and occupational credentials in schema.org is going well. There was a Credential Engine working group call last week where I summarised progress so far. The group has 24 members. We have around 30 outline use cases, and have some idea of the relative importance of these. The use cases fall under four categories: search, refinements of searches, secondary searches (having found a credential, want find some other thing associated with it), and non-search use cases. From each use case we have derived one or two requirements for describing credentials in schema.org. We made a good start at working through these requirements.

I think the higher-level issues for the group are as follows. First, How do model the aspect of educational and occupational credentials? Where does it fit in to the  schema.org hierarchy, and how does it relate to other work around verifying a claim to hold a credential? Second, the relationship between a vocabulary like schema.org which aims for a wide uptake by many disconnected providers of data, not limited to a specialist domain or a partnership who are working closely together and can build a single tightly defined understanding of what they are describing. Thirdly, and somewhat related to the previous point, what balance do we strike between pragmatism and semantic purity.  We need to be pragmatic in order to build something that is acceptable to the rest of the schema.org community: not adding too many terms, not being too complex (one of the key factors in schema.org’s success has been  the tendency to favour approaches which make it easier to provide data).

Getting data from wikidata into WordPress custom taxonomy

[there is an update of this work]

I created a custom taxonomy to use as an index of people mentioned. I wanted it to work nicely as linked data, and so wanted each term in it to refer to the wikidata identifier for the person mentioned. Then I thought, why not get the data for the terms from wikidata?

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Educational and occupational credentials in schema.org

Since the summer I have been working with the Credential Engine, which is based at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, on a project to facilitate the description of educational and occupational credentials in schema.org. We have just reached the milestone of setting up a W3C Community Group to carry out that work.  If you would like to contribute to the work of the group (or even just lurk and follow what we do) please join it. Continue reading

Partnership with Cetis LLP

TIL: getting Skype for Linux working

Microsoft’s Skype for Linux is a pain for Linux (well, for Ubuntu at least). It stopped working for me, no one could hear me.

Apparently it needs pulse audio to  work properly, but as others have found “most problems with the sound in Linux can be solved by removing PulseAudio”. The answer, as outlined in this post, is apulse “PulseAudio emulation for ALSA”.

The end of Open Educational Practices in Scotland

On Monday I was at Our Dynamic Earth, by the Holyrood Parliament in Edinburgh, for a day meeting on the Promise of Open Education. This was the final event of the Open Educational Practices in Scotland project (OEPS), which (according to the evaluation report):

involved five universities in leading a project based in the Open University in Scotland. Its aims were to facilitate best practice in open education in Scotland, and to enhance capacity for developing publicly available online materials across the tertiary education sector in Scotland. The project particularly focused on fostering the use of open educational practices to build capacity and promote widening participation.

 

There have always been questions about this project, notably the funnelling of money to the OU without any sign of an open bidding process, but at least it was there. With the OEPS finishing, two things caught my attention: how do we get political support for open education, and what open educational practice is current in Scotland. To paraphrase Orwell: if there is hope, it lies in the grass roots [hmm, that didn’t end well for Winston].

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Wikidata driven timeline

I have been to a couple of wikidata workshops recently, both involving Ewan McAndrew; between which I read Christine de Pizan‘s Book of the City of Ladies(*). Christine de Pizan is described as one of the first women in Europe to earn her living as a writer, which made me wonder what other female writers were around at that time (e.g. Julian of Norwich and, err…). So, at the second of these workshops, I took advantage of Ewan’s expertise, and the additional bonus of Navino Evans cofounder of Histropedia  also being there, to create a timeline of medieval European female writers.  (By the way, it’s interesting to compare this to Asian female writers–I was interested in Christina de Pizan and wanted to see how she fitted in with others who might have influenced her or attitudes to her, and so didn’t think that Chinese and Japanese writers fitted into the same timeline.)

Histropedia timeline of medieval female authors (click on image to go to interactive version)

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