Category Archives: Talent Signal

JDX: a schema for Job Data Exchange

[This rather long blog post describes a project that I have been involved with through consultancy with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation.  Writing this post was funded through that consultancy.]

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation has recently proposed a modernized schema for job postings based on the work of HR Open and Schema.org, the Job Data Exchange (JDX) JobSchema+. It is hoped JDX JobSchema+ will not just facilitate the exchange of data relevant to jobs, but will do so in a way that helps bridge the various other standards used by relevant systems.  The aim of JDX is to improve the usefulness of job data including signalling around jobs, addressing such questions as: what jobs are available in which geographic areas? What are the requirements for working in these jobs? What are the rewards? What are the career paths? This information needs to be communicated not just between employers and their recruitment partners and to potential job applicants, but also to education and training providers, so that they can create learning opportunities that provide their students with skills that are valuable in their future careers. Job seekers empowered with greater quantity and quality of job data through job postings may secure better-fitting employment faster and for longer duration due to improved matching. Preventing wasted time and hardship may be particularly impactful for populations whose job searches are less well-resourced and those for whom limited flexibility increases their dependence on job details which are often missing, such as schedule, exact location, and security clearance requirement. These are among the properties that JDX provides employers the opportunity to include for easy and quick identification by all.  In short, the data should be available to anyone involved in the talent pipeline. This broad scope poses a problem that JDX also seeks to address: different systems within the talent pipeline data ecosystem use different data standards so how can we ensure that the signalling is intelligible across the whole ecosystem?

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New work with the Credential Engine

Credential Engine logoI am delighted to be starting a new consulting project through Cetis LLP with the Credential Engine, helping them make credentials more transparent in order to empower everyone to make more informed decisions about credentials and their value. The problem that the Credential Engine sets out to solve is that there are (at the last count) over 730,000 different credentials on offer in the US alone. [Aside: let me translate ‘credential’ before going any further; in this context we mean what in Europe we call an educational qualification, from school certificates through to degrees, including trade and vocational qualifications and microcredentials.] For many of these credentials it is difficult to know their value in terms of who recognises them, the competences that they certify, and the occupations they are relevant for. This problem is especially acute in the relatively deregulated US, but it is also an issue when we have learner and worker mobility and need to recognise credentials from all over the world. Continue reading

On Talent Pipeline Management

I’m prompted by a #femEdTech tweet to write about some of the work I’m involved in regarding linking education to employment:

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The confusing concepts of credentials and competences

Back in July and August the Talent Marketplace Signaling W3C Community Group made good progress on how to relate JobPostings to Educational and Occupational Credentials (qualifications, if you prefer) and Compentences. These seem to me to be central concepts for linking between the domain of training, education and learning and the domain of talent sourcing, employment and career progression; a common understanding of them would be key to people from one domain understanding signals from the other. I posted a sketch of how I saw these working,.. and that provoked a lot of discussion, some of which led me to evaluate what leads to misunderstandings when trying to discuss such concepts.

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Indiana Appathon Credential Data Learn and Build

This week I took part in the Credential Engine’s Indiana Appathon in Indianapolis. The Credential Engine is a registry of information about educational and occupational credentials (qualifications, if you prefer; or not, if you don’t) that can be earned, along with further information such as what they are useful for, what competencies a person would need in order to earn one and what opportunities exist to learn those competencies. Indiana is one state that is working with the Credential Engine to ensure that the credentials offered by all the state’s public higher education institutions are represented in the registry. About 70 people gathered in Indianapolis (a roughly equal split between Hoosiers and the rest of the US, plus a couple of Canadians and me) with the stated intentions of Learn and Build: learn about the data the Credential Engine has, how to add more and how to access what is there, and build ideas for apps that use that  data, showing what data was valuable and potentially highlighting gaps. Continue reading

Inclusion of Educational and Occupational Credentials in schema.org

The new terms developed by the EOCred community group that I chaired were added to the pending area in the April 2019 release of schema.org. This marks a natural endpoint for this round of the community group’s work. You can see most of the outcome  under EducationalOccupationalCredential. As it says, these terms are now “proposed for full integration into Schema.org, pending implementation feedback and adoption from applications and websites”. I am pretty pleased with this outcome.

Please use these terms widely where you wish to meet the use cases outlined in the previous post, and feel free to use the EOCred group to discuss any issues that arise from implementation and adoption.

My own attention is moving on the Talent Marketplace Signalling community group which is just kicking off (as well as continuing with LRMI and some discussions around Courses that I am having). One early outcome for me from this is a picture of how I see Talent Signalling requiring all these linked together:

Outline sketch of the Talent Signaling domain, with many items omitted for clarity. Mostly but not entirely based on things already in schema.org

 

Talent marketplace signalling and schema.org JobPostings

For some time now I have been involved in the Data Working Group of the Job Data Exchange (JDX) project. That project aims to help employers and technology partners better describe their job positions and hiring requirements in a machine readable format. This will allow employers to send clearer signals to individuals, recruitment, educational and training organizations about the skills and qualifications that are in demand.  The data model behind JDX, which has been developed largely by Stuart Sutton working with representatives from the HR Open Standards body, leverages schema.org terms where possible. Through the development of this data model, as well as from other input, we have many ideas for guidance on, and improvements to the schema.org JobPosting schema. In order to advance those ideas through a broader community and feed them back to schema.org, we have now created the Talent Marketplace Signaling W3C Community Group.

In the long term I hope that the better expression of job requirements in the same framework as can be used to describe qualifications and educational courses will lead to better understanding and analysis of what is required and provided where, and to improvements in educational and occupational prospects for individuals.circles and lines representing entity-relationship domain models

 

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