Talent marketplace signalling and schema.org JobPostings

For some time now I have been involved in the Data Working Group of the Job Data Exchange (JDX) project. That project aims to help employers and technology partners better describe their job positions and hiring requirements in a machine readable format. This will allow employers to send clearer signals to individuals, recruitment, educational and training organizations about the skills and qualifications that are in demand.  The data model behind JDX, which has been developed largely by Stuart Sutton working with representatives from the HR Open Standards body, leverages schema.org terms where possible. Through the development of this data model, as well as from other input, we have many ideas for guidance on, and improvements to the schema.org JobPosting schema. In order to advance those ideas through a broader community and feed them back to schema.org, we have now created the Talent Marketplace Signaling W3C Community Group.

In the long term I hope that the better expression of job requirements in the same framework as can be used to describe qualifications and educational courses will lead to better understanding and analysis of what is required and provided where, and to improvements in educational and occupational prospects for individuals.circles and lines representing entity-relationship domain models

 

About the Talent Marketplace Signaling Community Group

Currently, workforce signaling sits at the intersection of a number of existing schema.org types: Course, JobPosting, Occupation, Organization, Person and the proposed EducationalOccupationalCredential. The TalentSignal Community Group will focus initially on the JobPosting Schema and related types. I think the TalentSignal CG can help by:

  • providing guidance on how to use existing schema.org terms to describe JobPostings;
  • proposing refinements (e.g. improved definitions) to existing schema.org types serving the talent pipeline; and
  • suggesting new types and properties where improved signaling cannot otherwise be achieved.

I hope that the outcomes of this work will be discrete improvements to the JobPostings schema, e.g. small changes to definitions, changes to how things like competences are represented and linked to JobPostings, and guidance, probably on the schema.org wiki, about using the JobPosting schema to mark up job adverts. Of course, whatever the Community Group suggests, it’s up to the schema.org steering group to decide on whether they are adopted into schema.org, and then it’s up to the search engines and other data consumers as to whether they make any use of the mark up.

The thinking behind the having a wider remit than the currently envisaged work is to avoid setting up a whole series of new groups every time we have a new idea [lesson learnt from moving from LRMI to Course description to educational and occupational credentials].

Call for participation

If you’ve read this far you must be somewhat interested  in this area of work, so why not join the TMS Community Group to show your support for the JDX and more broadly the need and importance for improved workforce signaling in the talent marketplace? You can join via pink/tan button on the Talent Signal CG web page. You will need to have a W3C account and to be signed in order to join (see the top right of the page to sign-in or join). The only restriction on joining is that you must give some assurances about the openness of the IPR of any contributions that you make. The outcomes of this work will feed into a specification that anyone can use, so there must be no hidden IPR restrictions in there.

The group  is open to all stakeholders so please feel free to share this information with your colleagues and network.

Disclosure

I’m being paid by the US Chambers of Commerce Foundation to carry out this work. Thank you US CCF!